Waynesboro Public Library: June 2013 Calendar

library-main2June – Book-A-Trip. Everyone reads Under the Sea-Wind by Rachel Carson and is invited to go on the bus trip to the Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Museum in August. Copies of the book are available to purchase at WPL. Call Parks & Rec at 942-6735 to sign up for the bus trip.

June 1 – Children’s Summer Reading signups begin. Receive a library buck for reading a picture book or ten pages in a chapter book. Use library bucks to buy books in the summer reading store opening June 15.

June 10 – Adult Summer Reading Club begins. Summer reading isn’t just for kids! You could win prizes this summer by checking out books, writing a review (of a book or audiobook), or attending a program. One prize will be drawn each week and all entries will be eligible for the grand prize drawing. Please register.

Tuesday, June 11, 7:00 p.m. – A Father’s Love. Waynesboro author, Pat Copper, discusses her autobiographical book, A Father’s Love: An Inspirational Memoir.

Wednesday, June 12 , 12:00 p.m. – Music at the Library presents Age Before Beauty performing Americana/blues

Friday, June 14, 6:30 p.m. – Friday Night at the Movies. Showing new releases on the big screen. Free popcorn and drinks. Check at the library for the featured film.

Saturday, June 15, 12:00 p.m. – Summer Reading Kick-off. Enjoy a show by Mad Science, face & hair painting, carnival games and more.

Wednesday, June 19, 6:00 p.m. – Lip Service to Literature (L2L). This young adult book club will be reading theUglies trilogy by Scott Westerfield. For ages 13 and up.

Wednesday, June 19, 7:00 p.m. – Book Club. Fascinating and far ranging discussion with other book lovers. The book is provided, participants vote on selections, and a staff member leads the discussion. Select a classic of your choice this month.

Monday, June 24 – Friday, June 28, 9:00 a.m.-7 p.m. – Scholastic Book Fair. Proceeds support the children’s department.

Tuesday, June 25, 3:00 p.m. – Hobby Hydroponics: The Weedless Garden. Dr. Ray Schneider, Associate Professor of Computer Science at Bridgewater College tells about the adventure of growing the perfect tomato, cucumber, or jalapeño pepper without soil.

Wednesday, June 26, 6:00 p.m. – Ace of Cakes. Master the art of cupcake decorating. Ages 12 and up. Please register.

 

Weekly

Monday

10:30 a.m. Swing and Sway This music and movement class is just the thing you need to get started in the morning. No stories, just song and dance.  Ages 0-6.

4:00 p.m. WPL Knitters. Bring your materials and socialize with other knitters.

 

Tuesday

9:30-11:30 a.m. Chat-N-Play provides interactive play for your little one and conversation for you. Open to children ages 0-3 and their caregivers.

 

Wednesday

9:30 a.m.  Mother Goose Time is an interactive program featuring songs, finger-plays, books, movements, and nursery rhymes for children from birth through age two and their caregivers.

10:30 a.m.  Story Time features books, stories, songs, puppets, flannel board activities, and crafts for children ages two through five accompanied by an adult.

 

Thursday

9:30 a.m.  Mamá Ganso, mother Goose in Spanish, features stories, songs, finger-plays, and movements for children from birth through age two and their caregivers.

10:00 a.mComputer classes are offered Thursday of every week. Classes rotate between Computer Basics, Basic Internet Skills, Introduction to Microsoft Word and Introduction to Microsoft Excel.  Call (540) 942-6746 to register.

10:30 a.m.  Story Time

1:00 p.m.  Story Time

2:00 p.m.  Mother Goose

 

Saturday

10:30 a.m. Story Time

Models needed: Would you like to be the face of Waynesboro?

waynesboro2editsThe Waynesboro Tourism Office and the Tourism Association of Greater Waynesboro have commissioned photographer Mark Miller to photograph the city’s attractions to be used for advertising.

The photos will showcase people dining, shopping, doing art, hiking and playing sports in and around Waynesboro. The photos will showcase Waynesboro parks, museums, and theater.

Male and female models of all ages are needed. If under 18 parental consent will be needed.

If you are interested in being a model for this project, contact Mark Miller at (540) 946-0003, or email at photosbymark@ntelos.net or through his website www.markmillerphotography.com

Muslim Journeys Bookshelf collection awarded to Waynesboro Public Library

library-main2Waynesboro Public Library (WPL) is one of 840 libraries and state humanities councils across the country selected to receive the Bridging Cultures Bookshelf: Muslim Journeys from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the American Library Association (ALA). The program aims to familiarize public audiences in the United States with the people, places, history, faith and cultures of Muslims in the United States and around the world.

The Muslim Journeys Bookshelf includes the following titles, organized by theme:
American Stories:

  • A Quiet Revolution by Leila Ahmed
  • Prince Among Slaves by Terry Alford
  • The Columbia Sourcebook of Muslims in the United States, edited by Edward E. Curtis IV
  • Acts of Faith by Eboo Patel
  • The Butterfly Mosque: A Young American Woman’s Journey to Love and Islam by G. Willow Wilson

Connected Histories:

  • The House of Wisdom: How Arabic Science Saved Ancient Knowledge and Gave Us the Renaissance by Jim Al-Khalili
  • In an Antique Land by Amitav Ghosh
  • When Asia Was the World: Traveling Merchants, Scholars, Warriors, and Monks Who Created the “Riches of the East” by Stewart Gordon
  • Leo Africanus by Amin Maalouf, translated by Peter Sluglett
  • The Ornament of the World by Maria Rosa Menocal

Literary Reflections

  • Minaret by Leila Aboulela
  • The Arabian Nights (anonymous), edited by Muhsin Mahdi, translated by Husain Haddawy
  • The Conference of the Birds by Farid al-Din Attar, translated by Dick Davis and Afkham Darbandi
  • Dreams of Trespass by Fatima Mernissi
  • Snow by Orhan Pamuk, translated by Maureen Freely

Pathways of Faith

  • Muhammad: A Very Short Introduction by Jonathan A. C. Brown
  • The Story of the Qur’an: Its History and Place in Muslim Life by Ingrid Mattson
  • The Children of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity, Islam by F. E. Peters
  • The Art of Hajj by Venetia Porter
  • Rumi: Poet and Mystic, edited and translated by Reynold A. Nicholson

Points of View

  • In the Country of Men by Hisham Matar
  • Dreams of Trespass by Fatima Mernissi
  • Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi
  • House of Stone by Anthony Shadid
  • Broken Verses by Kamila Shamsie

Art Architecture and Film

  • The Art of Hajj by Venetia Porter
  • Islamic Arts by Jonathan Bloom and Sheila Blair
  • Islamic Art Spots (short films designed, written, and presented by D. Fairchild Ruggles, and produced by Twin Cities Public Television)
  • Islamic Art: Mirror of the Invisible World (2011)
  • Prince Among Slaves (2007)
  • Koran by Heart (2011)

The books and films comprising the Bookshelf were selected with the advice librarians and cultural programming experts, as well as distinguished scholars in the fields of anthropology, world history, religious studies, interfaith dialogue, the history of art and architecture, world literature, Middle East studies, Southeast Asian studies, African studies, and Islamic studies.

In conjunction with receiving the collection, WPL is hosting a talk by JMU Religion Instructor, Danielle Abraham. “God is the Beloved: Exploring Islamic Poetry” will be held Thursday, May 23 at 2:30 p.m. For information about this program or the new materials, please contact Reference Librarian, Mary Ann Hayden at 942-6746.

The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf: Muslim Journeys is a project of the National Endowment for the Humanities, conducted in cooperation with the American Library Association. Major support for the Muslim Journeys Bookshelf was provided by a grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York. Additional support for the arts and media components was provided by the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art.

Wayne Theatre Alliance and Hamner Theatre foster new plays

One of the hallmarks of the Earl Hamner Jr. Theatre is its systematic development of new scripts.  Although the theatre space in Nellysford was closed last fall, the Hamner has continued its Virginia Playwrights and Screenwriters Initiative (VPSI) under the direction of its Artistic Director Boomie Pedersen and joined with WTA’s Gateway to present a new series of developing scripts.

“I have been impressed with the work of the Hamner Theatre and in particular its dedication to the fostering of new works,” said Dr. Clair Myers, WTA’s Executive Director.  “We are fortunate to be able to host this series of play readings.”  He also notes that the readings are free, although donations to cover expenses are accepted.

The VPSI program is a unique experience for audience members and a valuable one for the playwrights.  VPSI provides a venue for playwrights to workshop, rewrite and rehearse a new script with a company experienced actors and a director and a dramaturg.  Audience members have the opportunity to participate in the develop of a new artistic creation by listening the reading and then giving their reactions to the script in an open dialogue designed to provide the playwright with new insights to the play through the audiences’ responses to the work.

Pedersen is dedicated to the VPSI program.  “Without new plays,” she says, “We are – to paraphrase Terry Teachout – condemned to repeat seasons of Clybourne Park and The Odd Couple over and over…! New plays come out of our world now.  How better to watch our world reflected, than in a darkened theater, together.”  The Gateway readings will open that world.

The first in the series will be Dancing by Richard Washer on Sunday, May 19 at 4 pm at 329 West Main in downtown Waynesboro.  The author describes the play as “An intimate dance to music that blends life and memory.  Which is which?”   The script had a first reading at the Charter Theatre in Washington, D.C.   The actors are Chris Baumer, Dinah Pehrson and Lana Young.  The reading will directed by Boomie Pedersen.

The June reading will be True Crimes by Rick Steeves.  The date and time of the workshop will be announced later.

Mojo Saturday Night run ends with Erin Lundsford

Erin Lunsford 2012Kevin Chisnell closes out his popular monthly show, Mojo Saturday Night, with Erin Lundsford and The Smokey Bandits. He discovered the group at the last Waynesboro Chili, Blues and Brews Festival and was impressed by the response of the audience that did not want them to leave the stage. The May performance of Mojo Saturday nights is at 8 pm on May 18. Doors opening at 7:30pm.

According to Chisnell, “Audiences seem to love Erin Lunsford’s original songs even more than they do her renditions of the covers of artists who have influenced her.” Erin has gained a reputation as an amazing singer, but she is a songwriter and an accomplished musician on guitar and piano. She released her first EP in November that will feature 6 original songs that she wrote during the past 4 years. Growing up in Fincastle, VA, Erin was born into a family of very talented musicians. She says at Lunsford family gatherings, bluegrass jam sessions frequently took place. Her mother, Cheryl Lunsford, is a full-time guitar teacher at Fincastle Guitar Dojo. Erin credits her mother with being the biggest influence in her musical career.

Backing Erin are The Smokey Bandits with Waynesboro’s own Nick Quillen on the drums, Peter Michel on the keys, and Ryan Lipps on the guitar – all of whom are currently “4th years” at University of Virginia.

Mojo Saturday Night is the region’s premier blues revue, set in a “listening room” rated “One of the Three Best Muiscal Venue in the Valley” by Virginia Living. Tickets are $10 in advance and can be found atwww.wtagateway.com or by calling 540-943-9999. Tickets will be $12 at the door on the night of the show. Go to www.waynetheatre.org or “Like” Mojo Saturday Night on Facebook, for more information. Doors open at 7:30pmand the show starts at 8:00pm.

Local civic organizations support Waynesboro Writes

waynesboro2editsThe Waynesboro Cultural Commission is pleased to announce that unprecedented support by three of Waynesboro’s civic organizations to fund the publication of Waynesboro Writes.  The Waynesboro and the Waynesboro- East Augusta Rotary Clubs and the Waynesboro Kiwanis have provided financial resources for the annual publication.  “We are grateful to the three clubs for their aid.  Without their  support, the Commission could not have published the fourth in the series,” said Dr. Clair Myers, chair of the Waynesboro Cultural Commission.

Waynesboro Writes demonstrates the development of writing and thinking skills of Waynesboro’s elementary students.  From the short one or two sentence entries from kindergarten students to the longer, multi-paragraph pieces from fifth grade students, readers can see the growth nurtured by teachers in the our public schools.   Wenonah School principal Rebecca Jarvis who helped to originated the project reports, “Waynesboro Writes is a unique and wonderful showcase for student writing. The project is good for the students and for communicating the work that is done within the schools. Thanks to the generosity and dedication of the sponsors, our students’ work will be published and shared with the Waynesboro community.”

Sue Wright of the East-Augusta/Waynesboro Rotary echoed those sentiments, “This project celebrates the creativity, thoughts, and writing skills of Waynesboro’s students. We have been delighted with the outcome and anxiously await the next publication.”    Sara Scott of The Rotary Club of Waynesboro said that the club chose to support the project because “Waynesboro Writes seemed a natural fit with our values and goals of aiding in cultural and educational growth of our area youth.”  The same would be said by the Waynesboro Kiwanis Club which makes support of children its first priority.

The Cultural Commission’s first publication of student writings was Wenonah Writes.  An anonymous donor stepped forward and provided additional funds that allowed the Commission to expand the publication to include all four Waynesboro elementary schools.  Each school annually selects the best student writing from kindergarten through fifth grade.  The entries are combined to produce Waynesboro Writes.  A copy of the publication is provided to each student in the four elementary schools as well  teachers and staff.  When Waynesboro Writes is released, free copies of the publication will be available at the Waynesboro Heritage Museum, the Shenandoah Valley Art Center, Stone Soup Books and Cafe and the Waynesboro Public Library.

Waynesboro Writes is one of the many projects of the Cultural Commission to support community writing. Workshops on topics such as the personal essay, fiction writing, and screenwriting are hosted by the Commission.

For more information on these projects, visit the Commission’s website www.waynesboroculture.com.

Variety is the word at Richard Adams Variety Show

banana exRichard Adams Variety Show
Friday, May 10, 7:30 p.m.
The Gateway Theatre, Waynesboro

Howdy! The show this month has a “VARIETY” of music and some of my favorite acts. Sarah Lynna and this month’s version of the “Misfit Toys” will feature Sarah Lynna on vocals and guitar, Travis Weaver on Bass, Oscar (he only needs one name) on drums and sitting in with the band will be the legendary Buddy Thomas.

Speaking of Buddy, he will also be doing a few songs of his own. I just call Buddy up and say to his answering machine (He usually doesn’t answer) “Buddy…Surprise Me.”

Not speaking of Buddy, Louisa Esteban (last I heard she was around 10 years old) will be playing piano for the show. She comes highly recommended by her teacher and piano monster Orville Bame.

Not speak of Buddy, Kevin Chisnell (Harmonicat and host of the local Blues Night at the Gateway will be filling in for Bill Martin as guest host this month. Kevin will bring his “pile of harmonicas” with him and I’m sure will do at least a tune or two with buddy and will be on call to Harmonically Harmonize with the different acts during the rest of the show.

Not speaking of Buddy, my good buddy Jim Harrington has come in at the last minute to play some accordion on the show. He will be joined by myself (probably on Tuba and Soprano Sax and Trumpet) and speaking of….Buddy Thomas on Guitar.

Chris Wray – Sound Guy for the show will join (speaking of Buddy) Jim, Buddy and Richard for the World Premiere of the “Richard Adams Variety Show Ukulele Orchestra”.  Now if that doesn’t fill the seats, what will???

There will be the usual silly commercials, interviews and animal impressions as well as an update on “Dooms Day” and “The World’s Largest Chicken Dance”.

If you’ve never been to the show, it’s worth the silliness and talent. Check it out.

Tickets are $9.99 in advance and $12.00 at the door. Info: www.waynetheatre.org, 540-943-9999.

 

Waynesboro Cultural Commission announces romance writers’ workshops

waynesboro2editsAs part of its mission to serve area writers, filmmakers, artists and performers, the Waynesboro Cultural Commission announces the second in its series of informal workshops.  The romance writers’ workshops, scheduled for the first two Tuesdays in May, will introduce the genre and give aspiring authors the skills to understand the expectations of this popular fictional form.

Waynesboro is fortunate to have two award-winning published romance authors who will work as a team to present the workshops, from 7 – 8:30 pm May 7 and 14.

This is the second in the series of spring workshops, following the screenwriter’s workshop in March.  The Waynesboro Cultural Commission, the city-sponsored commission devoted to public access and understanding of all the arts, also sponsors “Waynesboro Writes” and the annual Virginia short film competition.

Registration for the workshops is required, although they are free of charge. Call 943-9999 to reserve a spot.  Although the workshops will build on each other, it is not necessary to attend the first in order to benefit from the second.

The authors leading the workshops have been praised for the quality of their writing and research.

Elaine Grant

Often happier in imaginary realms than the real world, Elaine Grant always wanted to write books and illustrate them. Her first published novel ROSES FOR CHLOE was a RITA Finalist, a Holt Medallion Finalist, and NONA Finalist. ROSES FOR CHLOE is available again throughAmazon.com in ebook format for Kindle and in print. MAKE BELIEVE MOM, Elaine’s first Harlequin Superromance, was a RITA Finalist and a Waldenbooks Bestseller. She has two other Harlequin Superromances,AN IDEAL FATHER and NO HERO LIKE HIM, which are available in ebook format.

After living over thirty-five years in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, she moved to the beautiful Shenandoah Valley with her husband of 38 years, an 18 year old tabby cat, and two Australian Shepherds. Now learning the exciting business of self-publishing and cover design, she plans to have more books available this year. You can contact her at elaine@elainegrant.com or visit her website www.elainegrant.com.

 

Joanna Bourne

Joanna writes Historical Romances set in England and France during the Napoleonic Wars.  Her book, Spymaster’s Lady, was an American Library Association RUSA Reading List Selection.  Three others have made the shortlist in the last five years. She’s  also a two-time winner of the RITA, Romance’s highest award for excellence in writing.

Joanna is fond of saying she writes about the Napoleonic and French Revolutionary Period because it was a time of philosophical excitement, high ideals, desperate conflict, sacrifice and really cool clothing,

She lives in the foothills of the Blue Ridge with a grumpy long-haired cat and the traditional Old brown Dog.

Joanna also maintains a blog for writers of all genres on her website.

Find Joanna at www.Joannabourne.com.

Shenandoah Valley Art Center to open Kristin Reiber Harris exhibit on May 2

WaterLilies&Rushes K Reiber Harris May 13The Shenandoah Valley Art Center is holding an Opening Reception on Thursday, May 2, 5:00-7:00pm, to open an exhibit of the artwork of Kristin Reiber Harris, which explores printmaking, bookmaking, and collage.

The Shenandoah Valley Art Center is located in Downtown Waynesboro at 126 S. Wayne Avenue.  Galleries are open to the public 10am to 4pm Tuesday through Saturday.

For more information, call (540) 949-7662 or visit www.svacart.com.

One series of Harris’ artwork features large woodcuts of plants reflected in water and celebrates the object as no more real than the reflection.  Another series of digital prints combines woodcut images with photographic self- portraits – object as real and reflected; artist as observer and observed.  Her most recent work collages segments of woodcuts while reimaging the subject from multiple points of view.

Having grown up on an old farm, she has retained a child’s fascination with those objects that appeared as treasures in her formative environment and they have continued as statements in drawings and prints produced the past forty years.  Her work reflects this reverence for the natural world and is influenced by Islamic and Buddhist art coupled with an Asian aesthetic of beauty. She received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from UCLA and a Master of Fine Arts in printmaking from George Washington University.  Among her diverse accomplishments, is her faculty position in the Art Department at Lynchburg College.

For the past twenty-five years she has run an animation and design business in the Washington, D.C. area, where the focus of her work is educational media for children.  She is currently developing mobile apps for young children that creatively illustrate her stories by using art objects from museum collections.

Shenandoah Valley Art Center: May 2013 Calendar of Events

svacThe Shenandoah Valley Art Center, during the month of May, is exhibiting the artwork of Kristin Reiber Harris which explores printmaking, bookmaking, and collage.  One series features large woodcuts of plants reflected in water and celebrates the object as no more real than the reflection.

Another series of digital prints combines woodcut images with photographic self- portraits – object as real and reflected; artist as observer and observed.  Her most recent work collages segments of woodcuts while reimaging the subject from multiple points of view.  Having grown up on an old farm, she has retained a child’s fascination with those objects that appeared as treasures in her formative environment and they have continued as statements in drawings and prints produced the past forty years.  Her work reflects this reverence for the natural world and is influenced by Islamic and Buddhist art coupled with an Asian aesthetic of beauty. She received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from UCLA and a Master of Fine Arts in printmaking from George Washington University.

Among her diverse accomplishments, is her faculty position in the Art Department at Lynchburg College.  For the past twenty-five years she has run an animation and design business in the Washington, D.C. area, where the focus of her work is educational media for children.  She is currently developing mobile apps for young children that creatively illustrate her stories by using art objects from museum collections. An Opening Reception will be held May 2, 5:00-7:00pm and the public is encouraged to come and meet the artist after she speaks briefly about her work.

In the Upstairs Hallway Gallery, an exhibition of Waynesboro Public Schools art program, Artists in the Schools, will be on display.  The program is an alliance between the public school system and the Shenandoah Valley Fine Art Center.  The program seeks to introduce professional artist/members to the students and art teachers in workshops that utilize the experience of the artists. Exhibiting the student produced artwork in the gallery setting exposes students to the formal world of art. Parents are encouraged to accompany their children to the opening of the show.  The Members Gallery will present works of art by SVAC members featuring the theme of “green.” Do not miss the close-up floral photographs by Deb Booth which will be shown in the Docent Room.  Her work has evolved to include scanning, fractals, and editing of the prints.  She likes to take “what is” and turn it into “what it could be.”

Come join the gathering of folks seeking creative inspiration, camaraderie, and sharing of techniques through free art activities.  Go to the SVAC website to learn more about workshops in beading, painting, and the making of artist trading cards.  Young artists should check out the ever popular Saturday Art for Kids, ages 6 – 10, presenting a creative art experience for children from 11 – 1:00pm.   Contact the art center for specific information, cost, and pre-registration for each class or group.  Open studio opportunities in the Virginia Ross Education Studio are available to printmakers and ceramic artists.   Apply on line at www.SVACart.com.

The art center is celebrating its retail alliance and Artisan Trail partnership with the Artisan Center of Virginia. In the SVAC Gift Shop you can find the perfect hand crafted gift in fiber, jewelry, wood, glass, pottery, and more by juried artisans from Virginia.

The Shenandoah Valley Art Center is located in downtown Waynesboro at 126 S. Wayne Avenue.  Galleries are open to the public 10am to 4pm Tuesday through Saturday.  For more information, call (540) 949-7662 or visit www.svacart.com.